Shaping Tomorrow

Biographies

We will be adding biographies of the ISC 2020 Chairs and Track Leaders as they become available.

 

Carsten Trinitis
Carsten Trinitis
Carsten Trinitis
Senior Scientist:
Chair of Computer Architecture and Parallel Systems at TU Munich

Carsten Trinitis received his Ph.D. in Electrical Engineering in 1998 from TUM, working on a parallel automatic optimisation system for electrostatic field simulation. After working in industry, he returned to TUM in 2001, where he now holds a position as senior scientist and is heading the research group on parallel and distributed computer architectures. From 2002 to 2010, he was also an assistant professor for history of science at Universität der Bundeswehr München, Germany. From 2010 to 2014, Carsten was full professor of distributed computing at the University of Bedfordshire, United Kingdom.

Carsten is spokesman of Gesellschaft für Informatik (GI)'s special interest group on "Ethics in Informatics", GI liaison lecturer at TU Munich, and member of the Zuse Society's board of directors.

From 2013 to 2019 he was elected member of GI's board of directors.

He has served in numerous technical programme committees as both PC member and PC chair and is currently chairing ACM Computing Frontiers' steering committee. His research interests comprise high performance computer architectures, microprocessor architectures, multi- and many-core architectures as well as the adaptation of numerical simulation codes to these architectures.

JANINE BENNETT
Janine Bennett
Janine Bennett
Manager for the Extreme-Scale 
Data Science and Analytics
Sandia National Laboratories, USA

Janine C. Bennett, ISC 2020 Tutorials Chair, is the Manager for the Extreme-Scale Data Science and Analytics department at Sandia National Laboratories.  Janine joined Sandia in 2009, with a research focus on developing topological and statistical data analysis techniques for science and engineering applications. Over the years, her work has evolved to include a broader HPC systems-level emphasis, encompassing in-situ analysis and next generation programming models and runtime system research. Prior to joining Sandia, Janine was a Lawrence Scholar in the Center for Applied Scientific Computing at LLNL. Janine holds a B.S. in Computer Science and Engineering, and an M.S. and Ph.D. in Computer Science from the University of California, Davis.

KEREN BERGMAN
Keren Bergman
Keren Bergman
Charles Batchelor Professor 
of Electrical Engineering,
Columbia University

Keren Bergman, ISC 2020 Invited Program Track Leader for Emerging Technology, is the Charles Batchelor Professor of Electrical Engineering at Columbia University where she also serves as the Faculty Director of the Columbia Nano Initiative. Prof. Bergman received the B.S. from Bucknell University in 1988, and the M.S. in 1991 and PhD in 1994 from M.I.T. all in Electrical Engineering. At Columbia, Bergman leads the Lightwave Research Laboratory encompassing multiple cross-disciplinary programs at the intersection of computing and photonics. Bergman serves on the Leadership Council of the American Institute of Manufacturing (AIM) Photonics leading projects that support the institute’s silicon photonics manufacturing capabilities and Datacom applications. She is a Fellow of the Optical Society of America (OSA) and IEEE.

Hans-Joachim Bungartz
Hans-Joachim Bungartz
Hans-Joachim Bungartz
Professor of Informatics and Mathematics 
Technical University of Munich (TUM)

Hans-Joachim Bungartz, ISC 2020 Invited Program Track Leader for Applications & Algorithms, is a Professor of Informatics and Mathematics at Technical University of Munich (TUM) and holds the Scientific Computing chair in TUM’s Informatics Department. After having earned degrees in Mathematics and Informatics from TUM, he became Associate Professor of Mathematics at University of Augsburg, then Full Professor of Informatics at University of Stuttgart, and returned to TUM in 2005. Since 2013, he has been both Dean of Informatics and TUM Graduate Dean, with responsibility of doctoral education TUM-wide. Dr. Bungartz has served on various editorial, advisory, or review boards. From 2006 to 2013, he chaired the Commission for IT Infrastructure of the German Research Foundation (DFG). In 2011, he became Chairman of the German National Research and Education Network (DFN). Furthermore, he is a board member of Leibniz Supercomputing Center. In 2016, he was appointed to the steering committee of the Council for Doctoral Education of the European University Association. His research interests are where Scientific Computing, CSE, and HPC meet. This includes parallel computing, hardware-aware numerics, high-dimensional problems, and aspects of HPC software, with a broad range of applications. Most of his projects are interdisciplinary ones – e.g., he is one of the coordinators of DFG’s Priority Program SPPEXA.

SUNITA CHANDRASEKARAN
Sunita Chandrasekaran
Sunita Chandrasekaran
Assistant Professor, 
Department of Computer Science,
University of Houston

Sunita Chandrasekaran, ISC 2020 Invited Program Track Leader for Parallel Programming & Performance Modelling, is an Assistant Professor with the Department of CIS, Affiliated with the Center for Bioinformatics and Computational Biology (CBCB) and holds an Adjunct position with the Department of Computer Science at the University of Houston. Prior to joinging UDEL, she was a postdoctoral researcher at the Dept. of Computer Science at the University of Houston, Texas, advised by Prof. Barbara Chapman. Her Ph.D. is on Tools and Algorithms for High-Level Algorithm Mapping to FPGAs, School of Computer Science and Engineering, Nanyang Technological University, 2012.

RYUSUKE EGAWA
Ryusuke Egawa
Ryusuke Egawa
Associate Professor, 
Cyberscience Center,
Tohoku University

Ryusuke Egawa, ISC 2020 Research Posters Chair, is currently an associate professor of Cyberscience Center, Tohoku University. His research interests include high-performance computing and computer architecture. He received the B.E. degree, Master Degree on information sciences from Hirosaki University in 1999, 2001, respectively, and the PhD degree on information sciences from Tohoku University in 2004. He is a member of IEEE CS, IEICE, and IPSJ.

MAIKE GILLIOT
Maike Gilliot
Maike Gilliot
Teratec / ETP4HPC 
Project Manager

Maike Gilliot, ISC 2020 Industrial Day Chair, graduated from TU Darmstadt (Germany) at the department of Computer Science. She worked as research assistant at the University of Freiburg at the department of Telematics, before joining Inria (France) in 2011. At Inria, she led the technology transfer office at the Inria Reseach Center of Saclay-Île-de-France:  as such, Maike was the “binding link” between Inria and its industrial partners: she set-up research collaborations and  technology transfer projects, in particular with SMEs (licensing issues, legal aspects and negotiation) and was also involved in support actions for start-ups. She joined Teratec and the ETP4HPC office team in February 2016. For ETP4HPC, she is coordinating the office team, and contributes to the EXDCI-2 project (mainly to the task related to SMEs, to the analysis and the assessment of the HPC ecosystem, and to the Strategic Research Agenda (SRA)). For Teratec, she leads Teratec’s effort in different H2020-funded project (Excellerat, FocusCoE), and contributes to Teratec’s European strategy.

TORSTEN HOEFLER
Torsten Hoefler
Torsten Hoefler
Professor of Computer Science, 
ETH Zurich

Torsten Hoefler, ISC 2020 Invited Program Track Leader for the Machine Learning Day, directs the Scalable Parallel Computing Laboratory (SPCL) at D-INFK ETH Zurich. He received his PhD degree in 2007 at Indiana University and started his first professor appointment in 2011 at UIUC. Torsten has served as the lead for performance modeling and analysis in the US NSF Blue Waters project at NCSA/UIUC. Since 2013, he is professor of computer science at ETH Zurich and has held visiting positions at Argonne National Laboratories, Sandia National Laboratories, and Microsoft Research Redmond (Station Q). Dr. Hoefler's research aims at understanding the performance of parallel computing systems ranging from parallel computer architecture through parallel programming to parallel algorithms. He is also active in the application areas of Weather and Climate as well as Machine Learning focusing on Distributed Deep Learning. In those areas, he has coordinated tens of funded projects and an ERC Starting Grant on Data-Centric Parallel Programming.

GUIDO JUCKELAND
Guido Juckeland
Guido Juckeland
PhD in Computer Science,
Helmholtz-Zentrum, 
Dresden-Rossendorf (HZDR)

Guido Juckeland, ISC 2020 Proceeding Chair, heads the Computational Science Group at Helmholtz-Zentrum Dresden-Rossendorf (HZDR), Germany. He is responsible for designing and implementing end-to-end research IT-workflows together with scientists and IT experts at HZDR. As a result, the group is supporting the digitalization efforts of the scientists both at HZDR and the Helmholtz Association as whole with respect to publishing high quality software and data sets alongside the traditional papers and articles. The group is operating an agile development platform with a highly diverse farm of continuous integration (CI) servers and provide training and workshops. Guido earned his PhD in computer science from Technische Universität Dresden, Germany, for his work on trace-based performance analysis for hardware accelerators.

DAVID KEYES
David Keyes
David Keyes
PhD in Applied Mathematics,
Extreme Computing Research Center, 
KAUST

David Keyes, ISC 2020 Program Chair, directs the Extreme Computing Research Center at the King Abdullah University of Science and Technology (KAUST), where he was the founding Dean of the Division of Mathematical and Computer Sciences and Engineering in 2009 and currently serves in the Office of the President as Senior Associate for international collaborations and institutional partnerships. He works at the interface between parallel computing and the numerical analysis of PDEs, with a focus on scalable implicit solvers. Newton-Krylov-Schwarz (NKS) and Additive Schwarz Preconditioned Inexact Newton (ASPIN) are methods he helped name and is helping to popularize. Before joining KAUST as a founding dean in 2009, he led multi-institutional scalable solver software projects in the SciDAC and ASCI programs of the US DOE, ran university collaboration programs at LLNL’s ISCR and NASA’s ICASE, and taught at Columbia, Old Dominion, and Yale Universities. He is a Fellow of SIAM, AMS, and AAAS, and has been awarded the ACM Gordon Bell Prize, the IEEE Sidney Fernbach Award, and the SIAM Prize for Distinguished Service to the Profession. He earned a BSE in Aerospace and Mechanical Sciences from Princeton in 1978 and a PhD in Applied Mathematics from Harvard in 1984.

MASAAKI KONDO
Masaaki Kondo
Masaaki Kondo
Associate Professor,
Graduate School of Information Science and Technology, 
The University of Tokyo

Masaaki Kondo, ISC 2020 Invited Program Track Leader for System Architecture, is an associate professor at Graduate School of Information Science and Technology, The University of Tokyo. He is also working at the RIKEN Center for Computational Science as the team reader of Next Generation High Performance Architecture Research Team where he is researching a next generation high performance computer architecture as well as strategies to improve power efficiency of exascale supercomputer systems. He received a Ph.D. from The University of Tokyo, Japan in 2003, an M.S. in Engineering from University of Tsukuba, Japan in 2000 and a B.S. in Information Engineering in 1998. He has published 34 journals, 37 refereed international conference papers and 14+ refereed international workshop papers in the area of computer architecture, high performance computing, VLSI design, and embedded systems, with focusing on low-power and high-performance microprocessor design, power management for high performance supercomputer systems, and dependable cluster systems. He has been committed to serve IEEE/ACM conferences related to high performance computing and architectures. He has served on several technical program/track chairs and 40+ program committees for international conferences and workshops.

LAURA SCHULZ
Laura Schulz
Laura Schulz
Leibniz Supercomputing Centre (LRZ)

Laura Schulz, ISC 2020 Inclusivity Chair, is responsible for strategic development at the Leibniz Computing Centre (LRZ) in Garching, Germany in the fields of future-oriented computer technologies, particularly exascale, artificial intelligence and quantum computing. Specifically, she works to establish cohesion and cadence across various efforts including HPC hardware and software co-design, research portfolio design, integrated service offerings, user analysis and profiling, and predictive needs assessment. She also builds and maintains key partnerships with vendors and alliances with regional and international ecosystem partners. Prior to joining LRZ in August 2017, she was Director of Marketing Communications at the HPC Innovation Center at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory in the US.

MARTIN SCHULZ
Martin Schulz
Martin Schulz
Professor in Computer Architecture and Parallel Systems,
TU Munich

Martin Schulz, ISC 2020 Program Deputy Chair and ISC 2020 PhD Forum Chair, is a Full Professor and Chair for Computer Architecture and Parallel Systems at the Technische Universität München (TUM) from 2017. Prior to that, he held positions at the Center for Applied Scientific Computing (CASC) at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) and Cornell University. He earned his Doctorate in Computer Science in 2001 from TUM and a Master of Science in Computer Science from UIUC. Martin has published over 200 peer-reviewed papers and currently serves as the chair of the MPI Forum, the standardization body for the Message Passing Interface. His research interests include parallel and distributed architectures and applications; performance monitoring, modeling and analysis; memory system optimization; parallel programming paradigms; tool support for parallel programming; power-aware parallel computing; and fault tolerance. Martin was a recipient of the IEEE/ACM Gordon Bell Award in 2006 and an R&D 100 award in 2011.

THOMAS STERLING
Thomas Sterling
Thomas Sterling
Professor of Intelligent Systems Engineering
Indiana University

Prof. Dr. Thomas Sterling, ISC 2020 Wednesday Keynote Speaker, holds the position of Professor of Intelligent Systems Engineering at the Indiana University (IU) School of Informatics, Computing, and Engineering as well as serves as the PI of the Continuum Computing Architecture Project at the Department of Intelligence Systems Engineering. Since receiving his Ph.D. from MIT in 1984 as a Hertz Fellow, Prof. Sterling has engaged in applied research in parallel computing system structures, semantics, and operation in industry, government labs, and academia. Prof. Sterling is best known as the "father of Beowulf" for his pioneering research in commodity/Linux cluster computing for which he shared the Gordon Bell Prize in 1997. He led the HTMT Project sponsored by NSF, DARPA, NSA, and NASA to explore advanced technologies and their implications for high-end computer system architectures. Other research projects in which he contributed included the DARPA DIVA PIM architecture project with USC-ISI, the DARPA sponsored HPCS program Cray-led Cascade Petaflops architecture, the Gilgamesh high-density computing project at NASA JPL, and DOE and DARPA projects exploring the ParalleX execution model and the HPX family of runtimes systems based on it for improvements in scalability and efficiency through dynamic adaptive processor control. Most recently Prof. Sterling was a faculty researcher of the IU Center for Research in Extreme-Scale Computing (CREST) at which he served as Director for the last two years. Sterling is currently involved in research associated with the innovative Continuum Computer Architecture for extreme-scale computing to establish the foundation principles guiding the development of future generation exascale computing systems exploiting non von Neumann concepts using active memory to accelerate computing beyond Moore’s Law. Thomas Sterling holds the position of President for the new start-up company, Simultac LLC. In addition, he is the co-author of seven books and holds six patents. He was the recipient of the 2013 Vanguard Award and is a Fellow of the AAAS. Most recently, he co-authored the introductory textbook, “High Performance Computing”, published by Morgan-Kaufmann in December 2017.

MATTHIAS TROYER
Matthias Troyer
Matthias Troyer
Distinguished Scientist,
Microsoft

Matthias Troyer, ISC 2020 Tuesday Keynote Speaker, is a Distinguished Scientist at Microsoft and affiliate faculty at the University of Washington. He is a Fellow of the American Physical Society and Vice President of the Aspen Center for Physics. Troyer is a recipient of the Rahman Prize for Computational Physics of the American Physical Society for “pioneering numerical work in many seemingly intractable areas of quantum many body physics and for providing efficient sophisticated computer codes to the community.” He is also a recipient of the Hamburg Prize for Theoretical Physics. He received his PhD in 1994 from ETH Zurich in Switzerland and spent three years as a postdoctoral researcher at the University of Tokyo. Later, Troyer was professor of Computational Physics at ETH Zurich until joining Microsoft’s quantum computing program at the beginning of 2017. At Microsoft he works on quantum architecture and leads the development of applications for quantum computers. His broader research interests span high performance computing, and quantum computing, as well as simulations of quantum devices and island ecosystems.

XIAOXIANG ZHU
Xiaoxiang Zhu
Xiaoxiang Zhu
Professor, Signal Processing in Earth Observation
Department Aerospace and Geodesy (TU Munich)

Prof. Dr. Xiaoxiang Zhu, ISC 2020 Conference Keynote Speaker, is the Professor for Signal Processing in Earth Observation at the Technical University of Munich and the head of the department Earth Observation Data Science at German Aerospace Center. She is also the co-spokeswoman of the Munich Data Science Research School (MUDS) and the head of the Helmholtz Artificial Intelligence (HAICU) – Research Field "Aeronautics, Space, and Transport". Her main research interests are remote sensing and Earth observation, signal processing, machine learning, and data science, with a special application focus on global urban mapping. Xiaoxiang is the recipient of the Heinz Maier-Leibnitz-Preis of the German Research Foundation (DFG), Innovators under 35 of Technology Review Germany, ERC Starting Grant, PRACE Ada Lovelace Award for HPC, Helmholtz Excellence Professorship and, most recently, the Leopoldina Early Career Award of the German National Academy of Sciences for "her outstanding achievements in satellite-based Earth observation for the assessment of global urbanization and natural hazards".